Cyberbullying on campus

03-Sep-09

Download the Booking Form Cyberbulling booking form

Download the Brochure Cyberbullying on campus brochure

Welcome to the latest Discovering Futures conference: Cyberbullying on campus: policy and practice in a 'lawless' world.

This is the first conference to discuss the phenomenon of cyberbullying in the post-18 education arena. Experts in the field of cyberbullying will contextualise cyberbullying with specific reference to the post-18 campus context, with the aim of helping you to understand and advance your knowledge of this new crime (whether it is referred to as cyberbullying, cyberstalking or cybercrime) and the growing threat this phenomenon poses to students and staff alike.

Cyberbullying is the term given to bullying carried out through electronic means such as mobile phones texts, social networking sites, email and chatrooms. Where it differs from the more traditional form of bullying is that for the person on the receiving end there is no escape. Often the perpetrators are anonymous and occasionally comments are posted about the bullied of which they have no knowledge.

A recent UK study found that 25 per cent of children and young people had been 'cyberbullied', feeling that there is no way out and nobody to help, some even contemplate suicide as the only way to escape. If this is the scenario for under-18s, what is happening in the post-18 arena? And this is not forgetting that teaching staff are also the subject of the bullies. Research studies carried out by our speakers show that bullying in the workplace is common.

Whatever your role within your institution, it is important that you have an understanding of this damaging phenomenon. This conference will discuss the causes and affects of cyberbullying along with some of the approaches available when identifying, managing and responding to the cyberbullies.

You will gain invaluable new insights into this under-explored, but rising scourge in our sector, and on the lives and experiences of those working or studying on campus; you will also discover some possible approaches and/or solutions when considering your response, be it through policy or practice, or both.

Why cyberbullying?

We have all heard about the rise of cyberbullying in schools where the bullies employ all the facilities which new technology has to offer. We therefore have a duty to understand how technology is being misused - we must not leave this complex and esoteric world to the younger generation.

 

New strategies are being implemented at local level via the Department for Children, Schools and Families, and LEAs; but what about those who are 18+ and still in education, as well as those who are employed on campus? The strategies strangely appear to be non-existent for adults and for those studying or working in our further and higher education institutions.

As more and more of us sign up to social networking, use email, or spend increasing amounts of time texting, we are making ourselves increasingly and unknowingly susceptible to having facts about us known more widely.

"Every technological innovation creates deviant as well as respectable behavior". (Edgley and Kiser 1981 p5)

Those in authority, or those who work with the victims, need to possess an understanding of the technology and the current regulation of cyberbullying so they can formulate appropriate policies and strategies to effectively guard against, and deal with, the fall-out from the actions of the cyberbullies.

Join us

Join the country's foremost experts on cyberbullying to gain invaluable new insights into this growing and harmful activity.

Our keynote speaker will be professor Michael Sheehan, Professor of Management and a Co-Director of Centre for Research on Workplace Behaviours, University of Glamorgan, who will speak on workplace bullying in higher education.

Key issues

Our speakers will spark debates on the most important challenges facing staff and students on campus.

Sessions cover:

  • the sexy side of the internet
  • bullying within Second Life
  • legal aspects of cyberbullying
  • regulation of cyberstalking
  • use and abuse of phone technology
  • managing your professional reputation
  • the crime of cyberstalking, and
  • a series of afternoon workshops where specific issues can be further developed and discussed.

Welcome to the latest Discovering Futures conference: Cyberbullying on campus: policy and practice in a 'lawless' world.

This is the first conference to discuss the phenomenon of cyberbullying in the post-18 education arena. Experts in the field of cyberbullying will contextualise cyberbullying with specific reference to the post-18 campus context, with the aim of helping you to understand and advance your knowledge of this new crime (whether it is referred to as cyberbullying, cyberstalking or cybercrime) and the growing threat this phenomenon poses to students and staff alike.

Cyberbullying is the term given to bullying carried out through electronic means such as mobile phones texts, social networking sites, email and chatrooms. Where it differs from the more traditional form of bullying is that for the person on the receiving end there is no escape. Often the perpetrators are anonymous and occasionally comments are posted about the bullied of which they have no knowledge.

A recent UK study found that 25 per cent of children and young people had been 'cyberbullied', feeling that there is no way out and nobody to help, some even contemplate suicide as the only way to escape. If this is the scenario for under-18s, what is happening in the post-18 arena? And this is not forgetting that teaching staff are also the subject of the bullies. Research studies carried out by our speakers show that bullying in the workplace is common.

Whatever your role within your institution, it is important that you have an understanding of this damaging phenomenon. This conference will discuss the causes and affects of cyberbullying along with some of the approaches available when identifying, managing and responding to the cyberbullies.

You will gain invaluable new insights into this under-explored, but rising scourge in our sector, and on the lives and experiences of those working or studying on campus; you will also discover some possible approaches and/or solutions when considering your response, be it through policy or practice, or both.

Why cyberbullying?

We have all heard about the rise of cyberbullying in schools where the bullies employ all the facilities which new technology has to offer. We therefore have a duty to understand how technology is being misused - we must not leave this complex and esoteric world to the younger generation.

 

New strategies are being implemented at local level via the Department for Children, Schools and Families, and LEAs; but what about those who are 18+ and still in education, as well as those who are employed on campus? The strategies strangely appear to be non-existent for adults and for those studying or working in our further and higher education institutions.

As more and more of us sign up to social networking, use email, or spend increasing amounts of time texting, we are making ourselves increasingly and unknowingly susceptible to having facts about us known more widely.

"Every technological innovation creates deviant as well as respectable behavior". (Edgley and Kiser 1981 p5)

Those in authority, or those who work with the victims, need to possess an understanding of the technology and the current regulation of cyberbullying so they can formulate appropriate policies and strategies to effectively guard against, and deal with, the fall-out from the actions of the cyberbullies.

Join us

Join the country's foremost experts on cyberbullying to gain invaluable new insights into this growing and harmful activity.

Our keynote speaker will be professor Michael Sheehan, Professor of Management and a Co-Director of Centre for Research on Workplace Behaviours, University of Glamorgan, who will speak on workplace bullying in higher education.

Key issues

Our speakers will spark debates on the most important challenges facing staff and students on campus.

Sessions cover:

  • the sexy side of the internet
  • bullying within Second Life
  • legal aspects of cyberbullying
  • regulation of cyberstalking
  • use and abuse of phone technology
  • managing your professional reputation
  • the crime of cyberstalking, and
  • a series of afternoon workshops where specific issues can be further developed and discussed.

Cyberbullying on campus: policy and practice in a 'lawless' world

from 9.00 Registration / refreshments
9.45 Welcome from the chair Christine Hodgson

9.50

 Keynote speaker Professor Michael Sheehan
Professor of Management and Co-Director, Centre for Research on Workplace Behavoirs
University of Glamorgan
Setting the scene: the trends on bullying staff and students in higher education
10.30   Dr Monica Whitty
Reader in Psychology
Nottingham Trent University
The sexy side of the internet - the dark side?
11.00 Break and networking
11.30   Dr Thomas Chesney
Head of Undergraduate Admissions
University of Nottingham

and
Dr Iain Coyne
Associate Professor in Occupational Psychology
University of Nottingham

Griefing in virtual worlds
12.15   Alan Reid
Lecturer in Law
Edinburgh Napier University
The legal pitfalls of mobile communications: Bullying anytime, anywhere, anyone
12.45 Lunch and networking opportunity
1.45   Dr Subhajit Basu
Lecturer in Law and Information Technology
Queen's University Belfast

and
Richard Jones
Reader in Law and Information Technology
Liverpool John Moores University

Where Evil Dare: Regulation of Cyberstalking 
2.30 Workshops 1
• 1   Dr Petra Boynton
Lecturer, Department of Primary Care & Population Health
UCL
Managing the emotional side of cyberbullying
• 2   Alex Henderson
Undergraduate and anti-cyberbullying campaigner
Y.A.N.A. - You Are Not Alone: the story of Alex's campaign and objectives
• 3   Amy Binns
Lecturer in Media and Journalism
University of Huddersfield
Managing your professional reputation
3.10 Break and networking opportunity
3.30 Workshops 2
• 1   Professor Michael Sheehan
Professor of Management and Co-Director, Centre for Research on Workplace Behavoirs
University of Glamorgan
Exploring the campus's propensity for bullying
• 2   Dr Monica Whitty
Reader in Psychology
Nottingham Trent University
How might we raise social awareness of the crime of cyberstalking?
4.10 Workshops 3
• 1   Dr Thomas Chesney
Head of Undergraduate Admissions
University of Nottingham
Second Life anti-bullying
• 2   Dr Monica Whitty
Reader in Psychology
Nottingham Trent University
How might we raise social awareness of the crime of cyberstalking?
• 3   Dr Petra Boynton
Lecturer, Department of Primary Care & Population Health
UCL
Managing the emotional side of cyberbullying
4.50   Closing plenary
Reports from the workshops, the themes, the possible solutions and the way forward
Plus opportunity for Q and As.
5.15 Depart

Please note, under exceptional circumstances the agenda may be subject to change

Cyberbullying on campus: policy and practice in a 'lawless' world

The Conference Venue:

University of Westminster
Cavendish campus
115 New Cavendish Street
London  W1W 6UW

 

Getting there

The Cavendish campus of the University of Westminster is located within easy reach of many tube and mainline stations and is in the shadow of the BT Tower.

The nearest tube stations are: Goodge Street (Northern line), Great Portland Street (Metropolitan, Circle and Hammersmith & City lines), and Warren Street (Northern and Victoria lines).

There are many bus routes which use Tottenham Court Road and Euston Road. If you choose your stop carefully you will only be about five minutes' walk away. 

The nearest mainline station is Euston, which is about 15 minutes walk away. Further afield are King's Cross, St. Pancras, and Thameslink railway stations.

Car parking is available for those with special needs (please contact the conference office if you require any special assistance, contact details below). There are also many public car parks in the area but be prepared to pay a small fortune! And don't forget, you may also have to pay the congestion charge for London (see TfL's website for further details.)

You can see the Cavendish location on this map:

View Larger Map

You can plan your journey using Transport for London's TfL website
 

Accommodation

Accommodation is not included in the conference fee. However, if you are travelling far you may wish to consider staying in London the night before the conference. The conference date falls within the summer holiday months and as a result, the University of Westminster is able to offer accommodation in its halls of residence, subject to availability. Should you wish to enquire about the University's accommodation please click here

In addition, there is a huge choice of accommodation available in central London, ranging from the cheap-and-cheerful to luxury five star! The University has negotiated special rates at a number of hotels for its staff, students and visitors, for further information please click here

You could also Google with your specific requirements, please bear in mind that hotels closest to the venue will be in the WC1 postcode area.
 

Your luggage

Space is limited at the conference venue to store your overnight bags. Subject to available space, you may check in your bags with us at registration, but please note that whilst we will do everything possible to look after your belongings we cannot be held responsible for their security. Please bear this in mind should you ask us to take care of your personal belongings.

Cyberbullying on campus: policy and practice in a 'lawless' world

The Conference Venue:

University of Westminster
Cavendish campus
115 New Cavendish Street
London  W1W 6UW

 

Getting there

The Cavendish campus of the University of Westminster is located within easy reach of many tube and mainline stations and is in the shadow of the BT Tower.

The nearest tube stations are: Goodge Street (Northern line), Great Portland Street (Metropolitan, Circle and Hammersmith & City lines), and Warren Street (Northern and Victoria lines).

There are many bus routes which use Tottenham Court Road and Euston Road. If you choose your stop carefully you will only be about five minutes' walk away. 

The nearest mainline station is Euston, which is about 15 minutes walk away. Further afield are King's Cross, St. Pancras, and Thameslink railway stations.

Car parking is available for those with special needs (please contact the conference office if you require any special assistance, contact details below). There are also many public car parks in the area but be prepared to pay a small fortune! And don't forget, you may also have to pay the congestion charge for London (see TfL's website for further details.)

You can see the Cavendish location on this map:

View Larger Map

You can plan your journey using Transport for London's TfL website
 

Accommodation

Accommodation is not included in the conference fee. However, if you are travelling far you may wish to consider staying in London the night before the conference. The conference date falls within the summer holiday months and as a result, the University of Westminster is able to offer accommodation in its halls of residence, subject to availability. Should you wish to enquire about the University's accommodation please click here

In addition, there is a huge choice of accommodation available in central London, ranging from the cheap-and-cheerful to luxury five star! The University has negotiated special rates at a number of hotels for its staff, students and visitors, for further information please click here

You could also Google with your specific requirements, please bear in mind that hotels closest to the venue will be in the WC1 postcode area.
 

Your luggage

Space is limited at the conference venue to store your overnight bags. Subject to available space, you may check in your bags with us at registration, but please note that whilst we will do everything possible to look after your belongings we cannot be held responsible for their security. Please bear this in mind should you ask us to take care of your personal belongings.

Christine Hodgson (Conference Chair)

Christine Hodgson is a journalist and former teacher. Until 2000 she was head of communications and publicity at the University of East London, and she is currently completing a PhD on twentieth century London novels.

Subhajit Basu

Queen's University Belfast

Subhajit Basu graduated from University College of Law, Calcutta University (India) in 1997. He was called to the West Bengal Bar and worked as a solicitor and advocate specialising in corporate law. He did a PhD at Liverpool John Moores University, on 'Taxation of E-Commerce from a Global Perspective' in 2003. He is the book review editor for International Review of Law, Computers and Technology (IRLCT). Reviewer for the editorial reviewer board of the International Journal of E-Government Research (IJEGR), IRLCT, JILT, Scientific Journals International (SJI), International Reviewer of Social Science Computer Review (SSCORE) and a member of the editorial advisory board of the Advances in Electronic Government Research (AEGR) book series, a member of the international editorial advisory board of AKCSN, a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Information and Communication Technologies and Human Development. Subhajit's biography has been included in the Marquis Who's Who in Science and Engineering 2006-2007, 2007-2008,2008-2009 for his contribution in the field of social and legal science. He joined the school of law at Queen's University Belfast in 2003 and is extensively involved with research related to e-government-developing countries and the issue of the digital divide, governance of cyberspace and role of politics, technology and law in IT, implication of information and communication technologies for the growth of criminal and deviant identities and behavior on the internet, and the role of technology in economic development of developing countries. He is a member of the executive committee of BILETA. He is a fellow of the Higher Education Academy, and a member of: the Society of Legal Scholars, Tax Research Network (UK), Digital Divide Network, and a member and reviewer of LEFIS (EU project on IT and legal education). Subhajit is also a visiting professor at the National Law University, India, and author of the book Global Perspectives on Taxation of E-Commerce Law.

Amy Binns

Lecturer in media and journalism

University of Huddersfield

Amy Binns, lecturer, originally trained as a photographer before becoming a reporter. She came to the University of Huddersfield from the Yorkshire Post, where she worked as a reporter for several years. Prior to that, she worked on various local newspapers across the North. She teaches practical and theoretical journalism, including writing and interviewing skills, practical law, desk top publishing using Adobe Indesign, and politics and world affairs. She has also introduced podcasting to the second year students on the journalism and media and English and media courses, and will be introducing video training from September 2009. These skills reflect the growing demand for print journalists to work across different platforms.

Petra Boynton

Lecturer in international health services research

UCL

Petra Boynton is a lecturer in international health services research, department of primary care and population health, University College London, where she lectures postgraduate students in social research methods and evidence based approaches. She specialises in research on sex and relationships health. Over the past decade Petra has been completing research and running workshops on improving the quality of social/health research. Her book, The Research Companion: a practical guide for the social and health sciences (Psychology Press), puts issues of tackling safety, wellbeing and bullying at the centre of good research practice. This work initially arose through her own experience of researching sensitive subjects (prostitution, sexual dysfunction and media effects of sexually explicit materials). However, discussions with academics and students at training events indicated many were experiencing fewer problems 'in the field' and more difficulties within their departments - after being bullied by colleagues, managers or supervisors. As a result of this in 2005 Petra ran a UK-wide online survey on bullying within academia, assisted by the Times Higher Education. Over 800 academic- and academic-related staff replied, indicating a wide range of behaviours experienced as bullying. Petra's work has since involved making sense of the experience of being bullied within academic environments, both in 'real life' and 'cyber' contexts. Petra applies her research by working as an agony aunt with teenagers and adults in both online, print and broadcast media. She is currently Agony Aunt at teen website www.mykindaplace.com and men's site www.mansized.co.uk, and in print magazines More! and Beauty Zambia. Her work on understanding communication on self harm led to her serving on the government's National Inquiry into Self Harm.

Thomas Chesney

Head of Undergraduate Admissions

Nottingham University Business School

Thomas Chesney is a member of the International Centre For Behavioural
 Business Research. He has a PhD in information systems from Brunel
 University, an MSc in informatics from the University of Edinburgh, and a BSc 
in information management from Queen's University Belfast. He is
 co-author of Principles of Business Information Systems, published by
 Cengage Learning. His research examines people's interaction with, and
 reaction to, information systems.

Iain Coyne

Associate Professor in Occupational Psychology

Institute of Work, Health & Organisations, University of Nottingham

Iain Coyne is associate professor in occupational psychology and a chartered psychologist and associate fellow of the British Psychological Society (BPS). His research interests include bullying at work and productive and counterproductive behaviour in the workplace and he has written a number of papers and has presented at national and international conferences on these areas. Currently, Dr Coyne is a management committee member of a European COST programme examining cyber-bullying within an educational context.

Alex Henderson

Undergraduate and anti-bullying campaigner

Institute of Work, Health & Organisations, University of Nottingham

Alexander J.R. Henderson is a student in the upper sixth at MacMillan Academy in Middlesbrough. Alex has been campaigning vigorously against cyberbullying for well over a year, and the campaign has grown beyond anything he ever anticipated or even hoped for. Alex battles cyberbullying on many different fronts and works with as many different audiences as possible; this has included working with Channel 4, being a producer of a theatre company and working as a volunteer. Alex’s career aspirations are to eventually, after many years of training, qualify as a doctor and specialise in either general practise or intensive care medicine.

Richard Jones

Reader in Law and Information Technology

Liverpool John Moores University

Richard Jones is reader in law and information technology and teaches information technology law, intellectual property law and family law on the LL.B and offers cyberspace law for other schools in the university. At postgraduate level Richard teaches the modules cyberspace law and intellectual property law. Richard was chair of the British and Irish Legal Educational Technology Association (BILETA) and a council member of the Society for Computers and the Law. He is now assistant editor of the International Review of Law, Computers and Technology, and is a member of the editorial board and joint editor of JILT and of the Liverpool Law Review (Kluwer Publications). Richard’s research interests are in the law of ethnic minorities, technology and the law, and law teaching and technology. He was invited by the Council of Europe to work in this area and awarded a research fellowship with IBM to investigate legal expert systems. Richard has published articles in the International Review on E-Commerce, IT Law in SE Asia and Creative Commons Licences and has recently published in Cybercrime. (Jones, R and Basu, S. Regulating Cyberstalking in Crimes of the Internet. (2008) Ed. Frank Schmalleger and Michael Pittaro. Prentice Hall I0132318865.) Also published in The Journal of Information Law and Technology (JILT). (October 2007). In 1998, 2003, 2005 and 2009 he edited issues of the International Review on IT and Criminal Justice, E-Commerce, IT Law in SE Asia and Cybercrime.

Alan Reid

Lecturer

Edinburgh Napier University

Alan S. Reid is a lecturer in law at Edinburgh Napier University. He specialises in European Union law, with a particular emphasis upon information technology law. He has over ten years experience as an academic and has written widely on the subject of child protection and communication law. Most recently, in 2009, he completed the Communications Law update for the Stair Memorial Encyclopedia of the Laws of Scotland. The Stair Memorial Encyclopedia is the definitive source of Scots Law. In 2008, Alan was asked to become a consultant on the legal issues surrounding child protection at the European level for ETSI, the European Telecommunications Standards Institute. Other notable contributions include a chapter for the Policy Press book New technology and the legal implications for child protection from 2007 dealing with child grooming and sexual offences in England and Wale, and an article on the legal implications for child protection wrought by the roll-out of 3G mobile phones from 2005.

Michael Sheehan

Professor of Management and Co-Director of Centre for Research on Workplace Behaviours

Glamorgan Business School, University of Glamorgan

Michael Sheehan is Professor of Management and a Co-Director of the Centre for Research on Workplace Behaviours. He joined the University in December 2004 as the head of the department of leadership, learning and management at University of Glamorgan, a position he held until October 2007. Michael’s interests are in researching and teaching in human resource management and organisational behaviour. His research interests relate primarily to the impact of organisational change on individuals, in particular workplace bullying; and individuals' experience of learning and implementing new skills such as those of group process facilitation. He has acted as a consultant to a number of public and private sector organisations in Australia and the UK and has presented a number of seminars and workshops in the public and private sectors since joining the University. In 1997 he was the co-recipient of The Australian Heads of Government Australian Violence Prevention Award 1997, Certificate of Merit, (Joint project with School of OB&HRM, Beyond Bullying Association Inc., & Qld Working Women’s Service). He has published a number of national and international journal articles in refereed journals such as the International Journal of Organizational Behaviour, International Journal of Manpower, The Journal of Occupational Health and Safety-Australia and New Zealand, The Australian Journal of Rehabilitation Counselling, and Industrial and Commercial Training. He has also been the guest editor of special editions related to workplace bullying of the International Journal of Manpower, The Journal of Occupational Health and Safety-Australia and New Zealand, the International Journal of Management and Decision Making and the International Journal of Organisational Behaviour. Michael is the co-editor of the books: Bullying: From Backyard to Boardroom, (1996) Millennium Books, Alexandria; Bullying: Causes, Costs and Cures, Beyond Bullying Association, Brisbane; and Bullying: From Backyard to Boardroom, (1999) Kobfai Publishing Co, Thailand, (Translated into Thai). He has published chapters in these books as well as in other books. He has presented a number of conference papers at international conferences, and has been an invited keynote speaker to a number of those conferences. He is an invited member of: the Programmes Board for Public Sector Management Wales (PSMW); Workplace Dignity Institute Foundation for the Study of Work Trauma, South Africa; the advisory board, The Workplace Bullying & Trauma Institute, USA, and he is featured in the Who's Who section of The Journal of Occupational Health and Safety-Australia and New Zealand (1998). He is a chartered fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (Chartered FCIPD).

Monica Whitty

Reader in Psychology

Nottingham Trent University

Dr Monica Whitty is reader in psychology in the division of psychology at Nottingham Trent University. She is the first author of ‘Cyberspace Romance: The Psychology of Online Relationships’ (2006, Palgrave) with Adrian Carr, and ‘Truth, Lies and Trust on the Internet’ (2008, Routledge) with Adam Joinson. She has published widely on the following topics: online dating, cyber-relationships, internet infidelity, online identity, possible selves, misrepresentation of self online, cyberstalking, cyberethics, and internet surveillance in the workplace.

Cyberbullying on campus: policy and practice in a 'lawless' world

Bullying is an unattractive human activity at anytime but when the bullies use the anonymity of the internet and associated technologies (such as mobile phones and social networking sites) the activity becomes even more sinister.

A THE survey in 2005 of 843 academics suggested that bullying was seen as a widespread problem. Almost 700 of those surveyed reported having been bullied at some time (THE 21 May 2009 p34). This research was led by Petra Boynton of UCL, one of this conference's speakers.

Research conducted by the Centre for Research on Workplace Behaviors at the University of Glamorgan, (the co-director, Professor Michael Sheehan, is our keynote speaker) has seen a growing evidence base to suggest that bullying at work is commonplace.

This conference promises to provide a fascinating mix of sessions as speakers discuss their research findings and expertise on the unwelcome phenomenon of cyberbullying on campus. They will offer views on the extent of cyberbullying in further and higher education, how powerful the phenomenon has become and the possible solutions available.

By attending this timely conference you will discover:

  • the varying definitions of what bullying and cyberbullying are
  •  
  • the nature and extent of cyberbullying on campus in further and higher education
  • the most up-to-date research findings from a number of studies in the areas of cyberbullying, cyberstalking and cybercrime
  • the extent of the problems and issues generated by cyberbullying on campus
  • how technology is being used in deviant ways to make cyberbullying such a harmful and anonymous act
  • what kind of solutions there might be and discuss with the experts how the problem might be approached
  • a range of experiences from speakers and delegates
  • in the final plenary, how the discussions in the workshops have considered the range and effectiveness of a number of potential solutions to combat the campus cyberbullies

Addressing your professional needs

Whatever your role or position in your faculty/school, department or centre, you will discover many of the issues surrounding this 'lawless' crime and have an opportunity to discuss responses to the growing phenomenon of cyberbullying.

  • Our speakers are all leaders in their fields who will help you to advance your knowledge of cyberbullying on campus by engaging with the specific challenges within post-18 education.
  • The afternoon workshop sessions allow you to concentrate on a particular topic and to discuss in smaller groups the issues of most interest.
  • You will hear your peers talk about specific issues surrounding cyberbullying and its regulation, and consider how to contribute to policy formulation, solutions and counselling strategies.
  • This is your opportunity for professional development in one of society's fastest-evolving and most complex fields; it is taxing regulators, policy-makers and law-makers alike, both nationally and internationally.

Cyberbullying on campus: policy and practice in a 'lawless' world

Bullying is an unattractive human activity at anytime but when the bullies use the anonymity of the internet and associated technologies (such as mobile phones and social networking sites) the activity becomes even more sinister.

A THE survey in 2005 of 843 academics suggested that bullying was seen as a widespread problem. Almost 700 of those surveyed reported having been bullied at some time (THE 21 May 2009 p34). This research was led by Petra Boynton of UCL, one of this conference's speakers.

Research conducted by the Centre for Research on Workplace Behaviors at the University of Glamorgan, (the co-director, Professor Michael Sheehan, is our keynote speaker) has seen a growing evidence base to suggest that bullying at work is commonplace.

This conference promises to provide a fascinating mix of sessions as speakers discuss their research findings and expertise on the unwelcome phenomenon of cyberbullying on campus. They will offer views on the extent of cyberbullying in further and higher education, how powerful the phenomenon has become and the possible solutions available.

By attending this timely conference you will discover:

  • the varying definitions of what bullying and cyberbullying are
  •  
  • the nature and extent of cyberbullying on campus in further and higher education
  • the most up-to-date research findings from a number of studies in the areas of cyberbullying, cyberstalking and cybercrime
  • the extent of the problems and issues generated by cyberbullying on campus
  • how technology is being used in deviant ways to make cyberbullying such a harmful and anonymous act
  • what kind of solutions there might be and discuss with the experts how the problem might be approached
  • a range of experiences from speakers and delegates
  • in the final plenary, how the discussions in the workshops have considered the range and effectiveness of a number of potential solutions to combat the campus cyberbullies

Addressing your professional needs

Whatever your role or position in your faculty/school, department or centre, you will discover many of the issues surrounding this 'lawless' crime and have an opportunity to discuss responses to the growing phenomenon of cyberbullying.

  • Our speakers are all leaders in their fields who will help you to advance your knowledge of cyberbullying on campus by engaging with the specific challenges within post-18 education.
  • The afternoon workshop sessions allow you to concentrate on a particular topic and to discuss in smaller groups the issues of most interest.
  • You will hear your peers talk about specific issues surrounding cyberbullying and its regulation, and consider how to contribute to policy formulation, solutions and counselling strategies.
  • This is your opportunity for professional development in one of society's fastest-evolving and most complex fields; it is taxing regulators, policy-makers and law-makers alike, both nationally and internationally.
Fees are not available for archived conferences

There are no papers for this conference